The type of diamond shape you select for your diamond engagement ring speaks to your style, but it’s really the setting that says it all. Depending on the side stones you choose or choose to forgo, the color of metal you settle on, and the direction you decide to set the center stone (yes there are multiple), your ring can look completely different from another ring with the exact same diamond. 

Make sure to research radiant cut vs emerald cut or emerald cut vs princess cut before finally deciding on emerald cut. Though once you have decided that an emerald cut diamond is the ideal diamond for the center stone for your own engagement ring, now you can explore all the unique and classic simulated emerald cut diamond ring settings to find the one that’s right for you. Below, we share many of the emerald cut diamond settings available to you to help inspire your dream engagement ring. The question is, can you pick just one?

A solitaire setting with an emerald cut center stone

What Is An Emerald Cut Diamond?

What is an emerald cut diamond? An emerald cut diamond is one of the fanciest shape diamonds. Its rectangular shape is elongated and elegant, and the symmetry of its rectangular facets and straight lines of its sides are sleek and refined. This special cut makes the diamond glimmer in the light in a subtle way that speaks volumes. While it’s been around for centuries, this diamond cut became popular a hundred years ago when the art deco movement of the 1920s had everyone after its chic, clean lines. Today, it’s worn by countless celebrities and coveted by all.


Types of Emerald Cut Diamond Settings

An emerald diamond is unique in many ways, one of which is how well it complements a variety of settings. There truly is an emerald diamond ring setting fitting for every unique personality and preference. Here are a few of the most eye-catching iterations of emerald cut diamond settings that are particularly ideal for an engagement ring:

Solitaire Setting

When you have such a high-quality stone as any emerald cut diamond you choose should be, a solitaire setting is a no-brainer. An emerald cut diamond won’t go unnoticed when set all by itself on a solid band. For the truly minimalist bride or someone who would rather spend more on the center stone than a fancy setting, a solitaire setting is perfect. Plus, it carries on the subtle, refined nature of the stone.

An emerald cut stone in a solitaire engagement ring setting

Pave Setting

If you are looking for a bit more sparkle in your setting, a pave diamond band is the answer. This style setting is still refined and understated but will catch more light than a simple metal band, and draw eyes to your ring. You may consider a pave wedding band instead or in addition to a pave engagement ring band. It is a great complement to an emerald cut engagement ring with a solitaire setting.

An emerald cut stone in a pave engagement ring setting

Three Stone Setting

Another way to add just a hint of sparkle to your setting and make the emerald diamond pop is by setting the stone with diamonds on either side. Yes, more diamonds means more money, but you can keep this setting affordable by opting for a cluster of three tiny stones on each side that form a triangle, rather than one big stone on each side. The choice is yours.

An emerald cut stone in a three stone engagement ring setting

Baguette Stones

Baguette-shaped diamonds have become a popular choice to pair with an emerald cut diamond. Baguettes, similar to emeralds, also feature rectangular facets so it’s a natural combination. Consider tapered baguette stones that are wider where they meet the diamond than where they meet the band for a flattering and elegant style that’s supremely timeless.

An engagement ring featuring a baguette stone

East West Setting

One of the more modern ways to set an emerald cut diamond is by turning it on its side so that the length of the stone goes from East to West, rather than from North to South. While unique, this setting is still incredibly timeless and simple. Plus, because you are only altering the way in which the stone is set, the cost of this setting is comparable to a solitaire setting.

An emerald cut stone in an east-west setting

Halo Setting

If a luxe setting is what you’re after, there’s no better option than a halo or double halo setting. However, the more halos, the more expensive the setting. Emerald cut diamonds bounce less light than a round cut diamond or cushion cut diamond, which both have star-shaped facets, but when tiny diamonds border your emerald-cut center stone, it will boast all the brilliance and sparkle of its brilliant cut siblings. 

An emerald cut stone in a halo engagement ring setting

Bezel

A bezel is a type of setting where the metal completely surrounds the stone. With emerald cut diamonds, bezel settings can emphasize the sleek geometric shape of the stone and sometimes make it appear even larger. Plus, these settings are known for their durability so your stone won’t go anywhere.

An emerald cut stone in a bezel engagement ring setting

Statement Prongs

Emerald cut diamonds have corners that are more sensitive to damage, which is why they are typically protected by sturdy metal prongs. You can make the stone look even larger with white gold or platinum (a stronger metal) prongs, or make a stylish statement by selecting a prong setting in a bold yellow gold metal or unique vintage style.

An engagement ring with statement prongs and an emerald cut stone

Split Shank Band

Complement the emerald’s long rectangular shape by setting it in a split shank band that connects to the stone at both the top and bottom corners. This artful design creates space between the stone and the band that makes it stand out and flatters the wearer. For added charm and sparkle, set the split shank band with pave diamond stones. 

An engagement ring with a split shank band and an emerald cut stone

Emerald Side Stones

Can’t get enough emeralds? We don’t blame you. For a truly elegant and fantastic engagement ring, consider setting two smaller emerald cut diamond stones on either side of the center stone. The resulting look is breathtaking, but the resulting cost can be as well. Emerald cut diamonds are pricey, and three are exponentially more pricey than one. 

An engagement ring featuring an emerald cut center stone with two emerald cut side stones

What Else to Consider When Selecting A Diamond Ring Setting

The Metal

In addition to the way you set your stone and the stones you set it with, the color metal you choose can make all the difference. White gold is the most popular metal for emerald diamond rings, and it’s easy to see why. The color, or lack thereof, contributes to the bright whiteness of the diamond. It allows the stone to shine and show off incredible clarity and color. Keep in mind, white gold and platinum settings will be unforgiving of emerald stones with a lower color grade than H, making their color more noticeable.

Emerald cut diamonds also look beautiful in yellow gold settings. Emerald stones set in yellow gold can instantly feel more vintage or regal. Rose gold is a more unique choice for emerald cut diamonds simply because its whimsical and romantic nature doesn't always suit the refined stone. However, that’s not to say it can’t be done. In fact, rose gold settings can soften the straight edges of emerald cut diamonds and add a flair of romance to the ring, especially when combined with pave diamond stones.

The Profile

The profile, which is how high or low the stone is set, is also important to the overall look of an engagement ring. The height of the stone makes a difference in the ring’s overall appearance and durability. In a high setting, the stone is set up above the finger with long prongs, which set the stone apart from the rest of the ring, putting it on grand display. In a low setting, the stone is nestled close to the finger and often enclosed in a bezel or basket setting that secures it tightly.

High settings are better suited for larger stones and allow for more light to hit the stone, maximizing its brilliance. Since emerald cut diamonds give off less sparkle than other cuts, a high setting can increase the amount of light, and thus brilliance, it emits. Low settings, however, provide more security to the stone and make it less prone to damage. Low settings are ideal for smaller emerald stones in solitaire settings.

Emerald cut diamonds are suitable for either profile type, so it’s really up to you to decide which style makes sense for your preferences and lifestyle.

An emerald cut engagement ring

What Is the Best Setting for an Emerald Cut Diamond?

An emerald cut diamond is a beauty to behold, so the best setting is one that allows the stone to truly shine. While solitaire settings do this incredibly well, that doesn’t mean you have to settle on something simple if it’s not your style. Channel Jackie Kennedy, whose emerald cut diamond and emerald gemstone ring combined two incredible stones of similar size and enveloped them in a thick yellow gold band. Or, flank an East-West set emerald with unique or vintage bands.

An engagement ring should be more timeless than other pieces of jewelry, but also can and should be representative of your unique style. So, don’t be shy, set your dream emerald cut diamond the way you want to and that will truly be the best setting for you.

Explore our own collection of emerald cut engagement rings to find the right setting for you.

Sources

Discover the elegance of emerald cut diamonds

High vs Low engagement rings

29 Emerald Cut Engagement Rings



*Here at Diamond Nexus, we strive to provide valuable information while being clear and honest about our products. The Nexus Diamond™ alternative is a patented lab created diamond simulate that, among all simulants, most closely imitates the look, weight and wear of a diamond, with two exceptions - it is absolutely perfect in every way, and it costs significantly less. Price points and environmental facts expressed in this blog were taken from popular online retailers and may vary. Learn more about the environmental impact of mining by visiting our blog.