AVOID THE SCAM

Unfortunately there are a lot of mined diamond companies and jewelry retailers that will do whatever they can to sell their vast inventory of diamonds. They produce scams to make you feel good about purchasing a mined diamond, when you should maybe think twice. We have done some extensive research uncovering all these scams to ensure you aren't getting tricked. Those diamonds deviants might have fooled us in the past, but not anymore!

Scam #1: Diamonds Are Rare — NOT!

To raise the price of mined diamonds and to heighten intrigue, diamond jewelry retailers claim that their diamonds are rare or one of a kind. On the contrary, diamonds might be the hardest material found on earth, but they are not the hardest to find. According to the International Gem Society (IGS) all gem materials are rare but diamonds are the most common gem. As of June 27, 2014, Alrosa, Russian's leading diamond company, has launched the largest underground diamond mine in northeast Russia.

THE MINE IS EXPECTED TO PROVIDE 5 MILLION CARATS OF DIAMONDS PER YEAR, FROM 2015 to 2019.

This will significantly add to Alrosa's output of carats mined. They expect to output 36 million carats in 2014 from their other various mines and let's not forget about the 36.9 million carats of diamonds they mined in 2013. I would say Alrosa's statistics alone make diamonds about as rare as a three-leaf clover!

(Alrosa launches Russia's largest underground diamond mine)

So where did this scam come from? It all started in 1880 when De Beers took control of 90 percent of the world's rough-diamond trade. According to the Washington Post, they "hoarded stones in basement vaults and doled them out strategically." They were able to convince consumers that an engagement ring should have a diamond. They soon became the symbol for the rich and famous.

Some more good reading

Are diamonds really rare? Myths and misconceptions about diamonds

Washington Post - Five myths about diamonds

WIRED - 'Trillions of carats' of diamonds found under Russian asteroid crater

Scam #2: Blood Diamonds Are Sold Everyday

Now not only will these retail jewelry employees tell you that the minded diamonds are rare but they will also tell you they are not conflict diamonds or blood diamonds. You can bet that is a scam as well! Many might think that blood diamonds are just from the movie or that the whole problem is solved but we are sorry to say that it is still a huge issue and many are still dying in Africa and South America.

ACCORDING TO NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC NEWS BLOOD DIAMONDS ARE SOLD TO FUND ARMED CONFLICT AND CIVIL WAR.

"Human rights organizations link more than four million deaths and millions more displaced people to the trade in conflict diamonds," states John Roach of the article. Thankfully that number is not rapidly growing due the Kimberly Process set up in 2003, which simply put, requires all diamonds transported across borders to have a certificate proving that they did not fund conflict. As much as this process has helped to decrease some violence, the conflict diamond business hasn't ended and "dirty diamonds are mixed with clean gems," as stated in a 2011 Time Magazine article The Return of the Blood Diamond. (And We Don't Mean the Movie). So sadly, if you were to ask an employee at a jewelry store if the diamond is a blood diamond, they will likely say "no" but have no clue where it comes from.

Learn more about how blood diamonds continue to seep into our society:

National Geographic - "Blood Diamonds" and How to Avoid Buying Illicit Gems

The Kimberley Process

TIME Magazine - The Return of the Blood Diamond. (And We Don't Mean the Movie).

The Wallstreet Journal - The 'Blood Diamond' Resurfaces

TIME Magazine - Not Just Out of Africa: South America's "Blood Diamonds" Network

CNN - What are 'conflict diamonds?'

Scam #3: Clarity Enhanced Diamonds

Not many people have heard of a clarity enhanced diamond and some jewelry stores don't want you to know either! There are different methods but essentially a diamond that has a low clarity grade, meaning it has a lot of fractures or cracks in it, is filled with goo to make it look better. Jewelers are now able to drill in and fill these flaws with a lead base glass, allowing the stone to appear to have better clarity and to be sold at a lower price point.

JEWELERS ARE NOW ABLE TO DRILL IN AND FILL THESE FLAWS WITH A LEAD BASE GLASS, ALLOWING THE STONE TO APPEAR TO HAVE BETTER CLARITY.

However, it has been found that a customer at a diamond jewelry company doesn't always know that they are getting a clarity enhanced diamond. According to ABC News, there is nothing wrong with selling them but jewelers will do so without discloser and explain that customers are getting them for an incredible deal. An ABC correspondent goes undercover and encounters retail consultants selling them clarity enhanced diamond and never mentions that it has been chemically altered. We recommend you take a look at the video below before heading to a retail store for an engagement ring.

ABC NEWS - Engagement Rings: Diamonds Decoded

Clarity Enhanced Diamonds – Does it Decrease Brilliance?

And, just for a laugh, here is an information yet funny video that sums ups the mined diamond scam.

College Humor - Why Engagement Rings Are A Scam

So who can you trust? Here are a few mined diamond companies that we think are doing it right:

Thank You!

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